Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy

Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy


Tinia Harris: I’m very happy that I’m here
at Harrison School of Pharmacy. It’s really exciting and I’m learning a lot. Lori Hornsby: I think Auburn prides themselves
on working with individuals to help them develop not only as a professional but as an individual. Jared Johnson: There is an Auburn family and
it’s real. It’s a relationship that we have with each
other. It’s the kind of care that we give for our
patients and that’s what sets our pharmacists apart. [Music] Richard Hansen: Auburn is special because
when you come here right away you’re welcome by faculty by other students by our tremendous
staff. And there’s something special about that that
stays with you for the rest of your life. [Music] Johnson: The profession of pharmacy, is always
changing. Therefore, it is important for our curriculum to be evolving all the time. [Faculty speaking with students] Hansen: We really took the traditional pharmacy
curriculum and threw it out. Hornsby: When we were developing the new curriculum
we first wanted to start with, what is it that we want our pharmacist to be able to
do? Not just the knowledge that they need but
what are the skills that they need to practice once they graduate. Hence, Practice Ready Curriculum. [Sound of faculty and students talking] Johnson: Our students have contact with patients
in the community from the first day they step onto campus. Harris: The Pharmacy Practice Experience gives
you the opportunity to go out and see patients in the community. Hansen: Years ago the state identified a need,
where the Gulf Coast of Alabama, Florida and Mississippi did not have a sufficient number
of pharmacists to meet the needs of the communities. So we established the Mobile campus to help
produce graduates that would hopefully stay in that region to then provide care for that
population. [Faculty speaking to students] Brent Fox: In the Department of Health Outcomes
Research and Policy, our goal is to improve medication related outcomes by focusing on
patient level, provider level and system level factors that can influence medication use. [Sound of researchers in lab] Miranda Reed: Collaboration is very important
because the majority of us are specialized in our area and techniques. But in order to address a research hypothesis
or to develop a new drug you generally need a lot of different techniques. A lot of different methodologies and a lot
of different specialties. Ren Arranda: From day one having the opportunity
to jump in with my faculty members and start that research and progress through four years
of school really excited me. Reed: Pharm.D. students can also take advantage
of research resources at Auburn . As for the medicinal chemistry pharmaceutics and pharmacology
core curriculum, students can study areas of diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular
disease, oncology, neurodegenerative conditions as well as infectious diseases. [Student talks with patient] Hornsby: We have five clinical rotation regions. This is where our fourth-year students are
able to take all of the skills that they’ve developed over the first three years of the
curriculum and practice in a real-world setting. Arranda: We get a diverse view of what pharmacy
really looks like in the state of Alabama and the surrounding areas such as Florida and Tennessee
and Mississippi. Harris: And just being on the traditional
campus you get to meet a lot of new people. You have a little bit more in common with
because you’re closer to their age. Reed: I actually graduated from Auburn University
several years ago and. I absolutely love Auburn. I love the town I love the people I love the
traditions. Hansen: The best part of my job is seeing
students succeed. I absolutely love watching them go on and to do great
things. That makes me very proud. [Music]


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