Discover your Future in Health at Adelaide | Dentistry and Oral Health

Discover your Future in Health at Adelaide | Dentistry and Oral Health


ok ladies and gentlemen thank you for
attending today and welcome to our online viewers. My name is Nicole. Firstly
we acknowledge and pay our respects to the Kaurna people, the traditional
custodians whose ancestral lands we gather on today. We acknowledge the deep
feelings of attachment and relationship with the Kaurna people to country and we
respect and value their past present and ongoing connection to the land and
cultural beliefs. And now it’s my pleasure to introduce to you the
Bachelor of Dental Surgery program coordinator Associate Professor Dimitra
Lekkas thanks Nicole can everyone hear me at
the back so welcome everyone and welcome to our presentation today about
dentistry and oral health I’d like to also introduce you to my colleague
associate professor Cathy Snelling she’ll come up and talk to you a bit later and
our student panelists that you’ll meet a bit later so welcome and thank you for
coming and spending some time with us to get to know a little bit about our
university faculty and the dental school our presentation will cover
information about the university, the Faculty of Health and Medical
Sciences the dental school and our undergraduate programs great so the University of Adelaide has
a prestigious history it’s the third oldest university in Australia and a
member of what we call the group of eight universities it’s ranked in the
top one percent of universities worldwide our graduates have gone on to
be both nationally and internationally renowned and we have five Nobel Prize
winners as alumni and over a hundred Rhodes Scholars as alumni the University
of Adelaide has over 27,000 students and 4,000 staff located over three campuses
so here is what we call the North Terrace campus so this sort of building
here in this area and then further down when you go towards the east side of
North Terrace will see the main university campus and this picture here
shows our lovely Jackie rounders like in blue and part of the beneath and hall
which is that building just in the background we also have campus at Waite
and Roseworthy our students represent a vibrant and very diverse population we
have students from Adelaide interstate and Australian territories and as well
as 20% of our students represented from international countries so as students
represent over 100 countries from all over the world so making a beautiful
rich environment for learning and teaching and you know learning from each
other so the University of Adelaide has five faculties and we belong to the
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences and our focus wider on that today the
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences ranked first in South Australia for life
sciences and medical degrees and rent first in Australia for health and
medical science research we’re also ranked first for South in
South Australia for medicine nursing psychology and dentistry a faculty has many notable alumni and
just just focusing on two of them today we have Lord Howard Florey and he was
awarded in 1945 for his role in the development of penicillin and has sort
of transformed health all over the world and also dr. John dr. J Robin Warren
awarded in 2005 for his role in the discovery of bacterium Helio bacter
pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease so again another a
wonderful alumni who’s transformed health in Australia and the whole world
our faculty also has 23 Rhodes Scholars and 14 Fulbright Scholars so Rhodes
Scholarship supports students who demonstrate strong propensity to emerge
as leaders for the world’s future and a Fulbright Program provides an
international educational exchange for scholars educators graduate students and
professionals so the university provides many opportunities for those who excel
you know to go on to do like many important things and talk about recent
alumni successes is dr. Claudia Paul She was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to
undertake a master’s of international health and Tropical Medicine at the
University of opposite and and she is actually our third Indigenous Rhodes
Scholar and also we have Ethan touch’ he’s a sixth year medical student who was
awarded the prestigious gates Cambridge scholarship valued at over $250,000 and
there’s only 90 of these from 6,000 applicants who awarded this scholarship
so he’s done very well so moving on now to the schools that are
within the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences so we have five schools and a
medical school and a dental school and I’d nursing school and the School of
Psychology and the School of Public Health so you can see where a sort of
health precinct our Health Sciences programs or within each of these schools undergraduate degrees are highly rent
our programs in the dental school are ranked first in South Australia and
second in Australia and 27th globally and a faculty also has a great state of
the art teaching and research facilities so we have the IH in this building so
Allied Health and Medical Sciences Building which we are located in sitting
in and then we have other facilities such as the Ray Last laboratories the Adelaide Health Simulation centre and the dental clinic simulation centre
so the dental sim clinic is on the main campus as you walk towards the east
bottom of Terrace so just a little bit about this building here and it was open
in 2017 and it’s located in what we call here in Adelaide the sort of South
Australian Health and biomedical precinct so if we go towards the West
here you will have the Royal Adelaide Hospital and then we have also the South
Australian health and medical research institute called the SAHMRI which is
that other building closest to this building which we all fondly call the
cheese grater okay so our building in this building here we have more than
1,700 students and 600 health researchers and academic and
professional staff so it’s a 12 story building on level 10 is the Adelaide
dental school and on levels 10 11 and 12 so the top three floors the Adelaide
Dental Hospital the building’s also home to Adelaide Medical School the Adelaide Health Simulation center and the Adelaide nursing school there’s also four levels
of laboratories and research areas and we’ve also got lots of teaching spaces
so this is one of the this is the largest lecture theatre in the building
there we have a lecture theatre the site here which is sort of like in
this semicircular shape and then scattered throughout the building
tutorial rooms flexible teaching spaces where students can do lots of group work
as well as on the third floor there’s a student hub and Support Center so our
graduates from the University itself and from our our faculty have a
reputation for producing high-quality skilled graduates that are well regarded
in the industry our degrees are designed to provide hands-on real-world
experience in allowing students to develop their skills and confidence to
excel in a range of careers once they graduate both in health policy
government and industry so our focus now on our on the Adelaide dental school so
this year the dental school celebrates its 100-year anniversary and over the
last 100 years the school has played a vital role in shaping the oral health of
Australians as well as the influencing dentistry nationally internationally
some examples of the work of past notable alumni from the dental school
are dr. Elizabeth Fannin his research in the late 1960s revealed the importance
of fluoride and the use of fluoride toothpaste and thinks that you know we
take for granted now in terms of looking after their oral health another example
is the work undertaken by professor raymond beck who revolutionized the
practice of orthodontics through techniques that he developed and they
have influence on the worldwide provision of orthodontic treatment these
are just two of us the successes but there are many others that make an
important part of our history and later on in the year the school so it has for
some formal celebrations but the students who organize their formal
celebration as well as the the school itself the Adelaide Dental School continues to
be successful and currently sits within the top 50 dental schools worldwide and
is ranked number one in Australia and New Zealand in the academic rankings of
world universities the recent excellence in research Australian evaluations
called era which were released about a month ago
raided that Adelaide dental schools research at the maximum level of five
which equates to well above world standard and so this attests to the work
and dedication of the academic staff who contribute to the teaching and research
within our school over the past 100 years
our students have treated over half a million South Australians the LA dental
school is renowned for its innovative teaching and world-class academic staff
and Cathy is just one of those we have a wide range of fully accredited programs
and the end at the at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels our leading edge
facilities enable our students to practice world
Arul life procedures on in a technically advanced environment so this is our
dental simulation clinic so it’s an IT chair facility the simply replicates of
dental surgery and provides real-life simulated clinical practice before our
students work on real patients in the clinic
our students do spend a considerable time learning and applying their
clinical skills in this facility before they commit spacian care
so both Cathy and I will explain you know where our students start to
practice in the secret so you can see here you can still receive simulates and
we try to teach all the students you know how it is to be a dentist and oral
health practitioner our dental and oral health students are
provided with a very broad range of clinical experiences so our students
start working in the clinic in fit from first year so it’s a very hands-on
practical courses that we provide both in dentistry and oral health and so
officially they work on each other and then they move towards working on
patients public patients so they work in clinics here in that I Dental Hospital
in metropolitan dental clinics around Adelaide and also in country towns in
South Australia we also provide our students experiences in our community
outreach program so here our students in final year both in dentistry and oral
health would go and do some clinical placements in common ground clinic which
is here in light-square and provide treatment and patient care to the most
marginalized and vulnerable people in in South Australia our students also are
very lucky to be able to participate in the Royal Flying Doctor Service so here
they would travel on a small airplane and go to some of the most remote parts
of South Australia to provide some basic oral health care in addition in the last couple years
we’ve also been able to provide our students a global study tour and this is
one of them is based in Vietnam so our students can apply to go on a two-week
intensive placement and the students will gain the global perspective on oral
health issues and further develop their cultural awareness skills and students
when they go to Vietnam visit a major dental hospital a local kindergarten and
to sort of community clinic centers so this is this picture here from one of
our students who went along last year and this is the beautiful halong bay and
this is our students with the children former kindergarten so here they’re
doing the promoting oral health and providing some basic health care
instructions to the to the children in the kindergarten so the LA dental school provider has two
undergraduate programs we have the Bachelor dental surgery which is a
five-year undergraduate program and the graduates from this program are
qualified as dentists and then we have the Bachelor of oral health program this
is a three-year undergraduate program and graduates qualify as oral health
therapists both dentists and oral health therapists are both involved in the
provision of dental care and work collaboratively collaboratively to
improve the whole health care of the community there are some differences
between the two programs and one of them mainly been the range of or what we call
the scope of practice and the range of treatments that’s provided so dentists
are involved in a complex in more complex treatment planning and the
provision of more complex clinical procedures but as you’ll see later on as
I present and then Cathy presents you can also sort of highlight there’s a lot
of commonalities in the in the to career path because they’re both serving to
improve oral health there are slight differences in entry requirements and
the length of the degree and the program content so in general if you’re
considerate when you’re considering a your career path and considering
dentistry and oral health but we’d like to emphasize it’s really important to go
and if you could have some work experience or shadowing so that you can
actually learn and find out more about the careers it’s really good if you try
to talk to dentists are off their epistle specialists and sort of actually
be able to sort of find out what they like about they their career you know
why they chose their career and how you know a lot how their past career pathway
has progressed over time some of the qualities that we would
expect of our students coming into the program and what you also develop when
you’re in both the programs is the ability to be an effective communicator
and have good interpersonal skills so as you can imagine with all the Health
Professions but especially dentistry and oral health you’re working very closely
with people sort of have an intimate relationship between the patient and
yourselves over your careers sometimes you’ll actually see their
whole family you’ll see the parents of children and those children will graph
and you’ll see their children so it’s a very close relationship and it requires
a lot of effective communication skills and all have professional programs
including our a dentistry and oral health expect a high degree of
professionalism so the public do trust us as professionals and you know we need
to explain display of high levels of ethics and cultural sensitivity cultural
awareness and we you know have you know high degree of professional behavior we
would expect again with both dentistry and oral health that it doesn’t both a
lot of handwork and so we require a you know a good level of manual dexterity
there’s a lot of you know fine fine skills required holding dental
instruments and drills but also you know being able to work with your hands it’s
a very applied is a career that you do work with your hands the other important
aspect of the career involves a lot of teamwork so you’re not just working on
your own you’re working with your digital assistant in your surgery you
have a receptionist you have practice manager you have an
oral therapist you might even have a lab technician you might be in a very large
group practice even with specialists in in the clinic so it’s very important
that you working like working with teams and you’ll see that our programs and do
you have a lot of teamwork activities when you’re learning and the other thing
to be that we that we foster a lot in our programs from the beginning from
week one is this understanding that when you start University and you finish
University learning doesn’t end there it continues for the rest of your lives
and it’s important that you learn how to reflect so we do a lot of reflective
practice in both the programs we you know reflect on how well you’ve done the
procedures or how well you’ve done the clinic that day and what areas you can
improve on so these are the qualities that we would expect you know our
students coming in to you know sort of have and then further develop as they
progressed in preparing to study both dentistry and oral health there are some
clinical placement requirements and this is because you’re working in a clinic
environment with patients and so these are you know like highlighted further in
those leaflets and booklets about the dentistry and oral health and such as
you know criminal history checks and various health screening tests also as
you’d see to be aware that there are incidental fees so coming into both the
programs there are some additional fees that you have to pay for instruments and
and plastic tooth models see in the dental sim clinic where you see the
student working he would have his own set of instruments and his own models
that you use for the whole program so those fees relate to that the other
thing that students also need to be able to coming into the program is there is
travel involved so not all the clinics are based here in the LA dental hospital
there are out in the community clinics and both the country so there is
expectation that students you know are able to be able to you know either use
public transport or their own transport to move move around the various clinical
placements I’ll talk a little bit about the Bachelor dental surgery program so
it’s the only professional degree program in South Australia and as I’ve
mentioned before we begin clinic from week one or first year so you actually
immersed in the clinical learning environment from the beginning working
in trios and role playing the role of the dentists the patient and the dental
assistant and our teaching facilities include the facilities here in this
building as well as the dental sim clinic in the batch of dental surgery
program and you’ll learn about the full range of treatments that dentists
provide from simple preventive treatments to complex treatments like
routine our treatment extractions of permanent teeth replacing
missing teeth with dentures or bridges as well as complex restorative treatment
like crowns you’ll be tackling real life case
scenarios from first year so a lot of our learning is not just with the staff
member sitting up at the lecture theatre just talking to the students it’s a very
paced based learning program which starts refers to you
so we present rule life case scenarios and their students will work in small
groups and they’ll report back to the whole class and tell it in and and sort
of discuss their research findings related to that case as I’ve mentioned
before there’s extensive clinical placements that begin from the theurgy
so stages will begin treatment on public patients and they’ll have a couple
sessions of clinic per week in fourth year they’ll move on to provision office
you know working with a lot more patients in more complex and you doing a
lot more complex treatments so here just an overview of the first
five years so as I mentioned yet the first year the focus is on initial
patient care and working in small groups with the case based learning scenarios
in year two we spend a lot of time here in the sim clinic learning and a lot of
the restorative will fit you know how to do fillings here we introduce you to
more complex complex sort of sort of physiology and underpinning Dental
Sciences in third and fourth year you learn more about diseases and disorders
of the head and neck and the human human body and you started to work more with
patients in fourth year – we introduced you to the specialty areas of Dentistry
like endodontics fixed prosthodontics removal prosthodontics so you and
children’s dentistry so pediatric dentistry and in final year it’s what we
call our consolidation of the clinical skills so your this is where them the
placements in the both metropolitan clinics and the rural clinics begin so
you you’ll be having a long clinical placement years it’s about a forty eight
week claim clinical placement year as students rotate in and out of various
clinical placements and this is also the opportunity where students go to the
Royal Flying Doctor Service in follow you and the common brown to clinical
placement a career in dentist a career in dentistry offer a lot of a lot of
diversity so once you graduate there is no internship you once you graduate you
can pretty much work straightaway so you register with opera in Australia which
means then you can practice both in private dental surgeries you can work
for the for government or public dental clinics all over Australia and Defence
Force have dentists you know all the different parts of the Defence Force you
can work as an academic you can become like a academically like me you can
certainly also have an opportunity to do dental research so your degree is really
you know window to so many career options full-time part-time whatever you
know your heart desires pretty much and just a little bit now that once
you’ve finished your five year undergraduate program and you’re
thinking about maybe specializing this is what we call postgraduate studies so
this follows on from dentistry often and it just wants to graduate work you know
several years in practice and some of them really sort of find that they like
a particular part of Dentistry and I think about specializing so in the NID
no score we offer on the slide here the whole range of dental specialties so we
have in genetics periodontics prosthodontics orthodontics pediatric
dentistry forensic odontology special needs dentistry oral maxillofacial
pathology and oral maxillofacial surgery so you can see we have a very broad
range of specialties and you know ranging from three years three days for
most of them it except for oral maxillofacial surgery which does require
a medical degree so you have a dental degree medical degree and then you do
oral maxillofacial surgery so before I asked happy to come to talk
about for betcha Laura health I just leave you with a testimonial for one of
our students who graduated last year so Jared was from the interstate and
found a country area yeah and it’s old and exordium here
studies so Nicole got over admissions into The Bachelor of Dental Surgery
programs Thank You dr. Lucas okay so as you can see from the screen we have some
comprehensive admissions for comprehensive admissions guides one is
for domestic applicants and one is for international applicants so depending on
where you fit please access the correct and guide it has all of the detail that
you will need including timelines and the actual process that you would need
to follow as well and we can send those out to you after the sessions so today
I’m going to focus on the application process for their domestic applicants
and I will briefly touch on the international one but we won’t spend too
much time on that one so there are some prerequisite subjects
that the students would need to complete throughout their studies in year 12 and
they are two science subjects one from chemistry mathematical methods
specialist maths physics and one from biology geology chemistry and physics so
you can see there that there are some quiet science-based subjects that you
will need to study that’s probably a lot to take in so we can talk to you about
that afterwards as well the academic school that we’re looking for for the
Bachelor of Dental Surgery is a minimum 8 R of 90 so 9 0 or above our if you’re
studying the IB that’s a minimum score of 33 you should have now all registered
for the UK if you’re considering applying for entry in 2020 that has now
closed you will set the you catch and that determines whether you then get
invited or are eligible to be invited for an interview so the say take
applications happen online they will open in August and close strictly in
September so make sure you access the guides to check those dates out because
we don’t accept late applications as I mentioned there will be an eligibility
outcome so how you have performed in the UK against other applicants will
determine whether you actually are eligible for an interview the interviews
are held in late November early December here
in the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences Building when you actually get
your eligibility outcome you’re able to log on to our admission system and see
whether you’re eligible to book an interview if you are it will take you to
a system to allow you to select from sometimes if you’re not eligible at that
stage then we would encourage you to activate your backup plans everybody
needs a back-up plan so if you don’t have one now is the time to start
considering that and we can talk a little bit more in detail about that you
come and have your interview and then in then there won’t be offers coming out
later this year and early into next year so we have 38 Commonwealth supported
places for the Bachelor of Dental Surgery for 2020 and within that we also
have a couple of places for rural pathway applicants so if you do live in
a rural area we would encourage you to apply under that pathway and we also
have a couple of places and saved for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
applicants as well so yes I can see some of you saying oh there’s not many places
yes that’s right and it is quite a competitive entry process so the things
that dr. Lucas was talking about earlier about accessing people that are already
in the field is really really important so that one you understand what you may
be getting yourself into but to understand what being a dentist or an
oral health therapist is like that will help you when you come to make your
decisions but also help you throughout the interview process as well okay we
need to know that you know that you’ve considered this I was speaking to
someone recently who was considering dentistry and we were talking about what
the challenges might be and he brought up an interesting point he was six foot
five and said I don’t actually know whether I’m going to be able to stand
over somebody all day every day in it working in a really small space so those
are the sorts of things that he hadn’t thought about before but once he was
able to actually go into the clinic and access some work experience and some
shadowing that was an issue that he needed to work through I’m not sure what
the outcome was but it was something that he raised so it’s down to that
level of detail that you may need to think about whether this is for you
so for the international guests here today or online there is some
prerequisite subjects the same as I mentioned before the academic score is
the same so an international eight R of 90 or above there are some English
language requirements for all international students and you need an
IELTS level of seven there’s an online application process and instead of thing
you cat you would set the personal qualities assessment test it’s a very
similar test assessing essentially for the same qualities that we’re looking
for in our future clinicians and based on that determines whether you then get
invited or are eligible to be invited for an interview okay you will then see
the interview and then offers come out after that once we have all of the steps
of the process I’m now going to invite Cathy Snelling she is one of our
educational experts in The Bachelor of our health she will talk to you about
oral health and then I’ll talk to you a little bit about those admissions and
then we’ll hand it over to the students who are eagerly waiting over there over
to you Cathy thanks to Carl just clear my throat good morning everyone
oh sorry but afternoon to those that are here in the building today or people
that are watching online I’m delighted to have the chance to share with you
some information about the oral health program which sits proudly side-by-side
in the Adelaide dental school with the Bachelor of Dental Surgery program The
Bachelor of oral health program I guess is one that people aren’t really often
too sure what it encompasses and when I say that
Dimi mention of the delayed dental school is a hundred years old this year
so the Bachelor of Dental Surgery course is a hundred years old
The Bachelor of our oral health course commenced in 2002 so we’re not quite 20
years old so quite clearly the newer kid on the block sometimes people aren’t too
sure I think it reflects very much the change in health care provision not just
in dentistry but across the board and some comparisons would be you know
doctors have been around for a very long time allied health professionals like
physiotherapists soccer national therapists podiatrists they’ve
been a more recent addition to the team and have really enriched the team and I
see the oral health therapist has been very much the dental equivalent of the
physiotherapist all the podiatrists in fact podiatrists could almost use the
same chair as us just down the other end so we could probably get a practice
going now The Bachelor all health students here at the University of
Adelaide as that we’ve already talked briefly about do you have a lot of
common classes with the dental students because quite clearly a lot of the
common core things like dental morphology and ashmi and physiology no
matter what level your scope of practice is going to head to you still need to
know the basics and it’s great that the oral health students have the same
exposure to many things that the dental students do because ultimately they end
up working with them in practice so the teamwork aspect starts very early in the
program I guess the major point of difference I
would say beyond the you know complexities of practice for example I
can do fillings in teeth that involve quite large areas of the crown of the
tooth but a dentist does more complex crowns and root canals things I don’t
really want to do anyway but having said that also we’re very focused on
prevention because as we all know dental disease is rampant in our community and
ironically it’s a very preventable disease so quite often when we work with
our patients we spend more time with them working on their prevention plan
because what we don’t want to do is a whole lot of work that we often have the
dentist come on board and do a lot more and then we see the patient in 12 months
and they’ve got more disease it’s very demoralizing to dental practitioners I
was always told on my first day of uni that the ultimate aim of anyone in
dentistry is to put themselves out of a job
unfortunately the need for dental practitioners is increasing so the
preventive aspect of the program is very important I think it makes it almost a
social science approach we do have the same facilities in terms of access we
have facilities here in this building students do some clinical placements on
the 11th and 12th floor and we’re very very fortunate that we have access to
clinics all across the metropolitan area I go as far north as Elizabeth and as
far south there’s no longer in any given week I have to remember what day it is
when I get in like my car the good thing is that all the clinics are very
strategically situated near railway stations and shopping centers so our
students have to travel but a lot of them go on to train or you know that’s
where people often sort of think well you know it’s a lot of travel we have a
small cohort of around 30 to 35 as our students will probably tell you
everybody knows everybody they’re quite diverse and it’s a very
supportive community so we’re really proud of the fact that our our students
really support each other we use the dental simulation clinic extensively and
then of course we have very early clinical exposure in a three year
program which is I think the equivalent of a lot of the four-year allied health
it’s a very intensive program our students are here five days a week often
all day every day it’s it’s similar to the dental program we actually start our
clinical experience working on patients well our second years have started just
after Easter so more than half the course is spent in clinics clearly we’re
not doing really complex things when they start they progress but it really
is a very enriching opportunity to honestly find out whether it’s the job
for you because a lot of people come into dentistry and oral health very
focused on the aspects which are very important the science and the
clinical theory that often be quite shocked when they get to the clinic and
students have said to me I don’t know what to say you’ve got a patient there
that’s looking at you and it’s another aspect that I think how school does
really well now we focus a lot on communication we’re going to have people
that come in and simulated patients some of them overactive use but that’s great
and our students actually get practice at talking to someone that comes in and
says I hate the dentist and I hate needles I don’t want anything to hurt
now you can imagine as a dental student or an oral health student dealing with
that in the clinic is a very confronting thing but the good thing is we give our
students opportunities to practice and get feedback and get coaching ahead of
that and our simulation in the digital sim clinic and also with patients means
that virtually everything that our students do in the real world they have
a chance to practice first and I think that’s a real strength of our school our
our simulation experiences we’ve also got you can see just in that slide there
we’ve got virtual reality haptics in our simulation clinic which our oral health
students use they’re made by the same people that make flight simulators for
pilots and if you get the chance to come to open day or even if you arrange your
visit we usually can’t get the parents or the grandparents off them they love
having your drill it’s quite amazing so we have lots of very modern equipment as
well the last thing I think that I’m really proud about our oral health
courses is that our finalist genes do a year-long research project and it’s very
diverse they come up with the topic many of them do things like you know social
problems accessing health or a really huge area of Dentistry which is growing
it’s called jared ontology which means looking after old people in their teeth
now well when I was a student that would just basically mean having plain
dentures literally nowadays my dad who’s 90
still has all his own teeth now that’s great but you can imagine he’s got
dementia he needs support and a lot of our oral health graduates work in
nursing home aged care so this is helping those people live quality lives
so that’s a wonderful area that you may not think about when you come in to
either dentistry or oral health but it’s an area that I see that we can really
make a contribution to so just quickly first year similar to the dental program
is obviously very introductory and probably more theory weighted because
there’s so much to learn and you know very intensive three-year program we do
cram a lot into first year and I think it’s very much the same in dentistry
what we do do is a lot of simulation practice they do a lot of theory in
anatomy physiology in the theory of even the life cycle you know patients that
come to us from very early ages to one of our students or a patient who was 98
and who wanted to stick her when they finished and like we told her she’d have
to be a good girl so looking at people because the the role that we have is
very clearly focused on the mouth and the teeth but in truth the role that we
have is actually working with people and I think that actually makes me as a
person that’s been in the profession for a long time it keeps me in the
profession because teeth are gray but they’re a little bit boring if you
just think about the teeth they’re sitting in someone’s mouth that’s got a
whole story and everybody has probably got a dental experience they can think
of hopefully it was a good one because dentistry hasn’t always enjoyed the best
reputation as what people do but most people nowadays I don’t think they mind
as much because dentistry has changed so very much so we focus a lot on that in
first year second year we’d to me start to do more hands-on things in our
simulation we start clinical practice and we also
continue theory in the more complex areas of medically compromised patients
as well history as our students will tell you our two students here today are
in Sergi it’s a clinical placement year like the final year of Dentistry so they
pretty much spend almost all the year out in clinics they do some online
lessons and tutorials they still and I work I’ve got the pleasure of working
with finally students and and really seeing them put all the things they’ve
learned in the first couple of years into practice so that’s very satisfying
so when you do finish the oral health program you register with the art Pro
Agency as an oral health therapist which is a registerable qualification and for
those of you that may remember going to the school dental clinic years ago you
saw dental therapists that’s part of the role but it also involves dental hygiene
as well so it’s a combined sort of a role that has a whole range of duties
that go across the lifespan so we do provide a range of general dental
treatment and also the the hygiene services and let’s face it now when you
see those shows with people coming in for the makeovers where’s the first
place they go they you should go to the dentist don’t they and get their teeth
sorted so things like whitening orthodontics people aghast when I tell
them about in my mother’s era a lot of women for their 21st birthday had all
their teeth taken out and dentures put in we all go oh my god
that was actually good dentistry and that was back in the forties I guess but
nowadays people would think that’s the last thing that they want if people lose
a tooth we’re now we’ve now got implants now implants are putting off and by a
dentist or a specialist but the oral health therapist does the maintenance of
them because they’ve got to be maintained with room hygiene and care so
we work very closely in all aspects of of Dentistry with with dentists and
specialists we do a lot of health promotion in the
communities and where our graduates work is as diverse as the dentists that come
out of this university I was in Melbourne just on Friday and the
Australian Dental Council who runs all the examinations for overseas qualified
dentists who want to come into the country and practice the manager of the
examination centre is an Adelaide oral health graduate I was very proud to see
him there others work in specialist practice some
of them have come into academia and are now my colleagues some have gone on to
research some of them have gone on to do dentistry now all health is not a given
pathway but many of our graduates do go on and apply and enjoy the challenge of
taking on high level skills and also work part-time while they’re studying in
practice as oral health therapists so for some people who don’t often get into
dentistry they see it as a possibility as a second option because it gets them
into the profession it lets them understand what it’s about
and there are pathways that they may follow up but I want to reinforce that
if you get into oral health it’s not automatically that you get into
dentistry if you’ve done it we we have a standalone application process but it is
something that people have seen as I’ve loved oral health I’m gonna go on and
apply and obviously they’re a very strong applicant because they’ve got the
experience of knowing about dentistry so I guess just wanted to stress that and
as I said research is something now that a lot of our graduates are going into as
well so very diverse yep so I’ll just leave you with one of our our graduates
from last year henna I’ve known Hannah for a long time I was
actually her lecturer when she was a dental assistant and she came up to me
one class and she just left school and she’d done her dental assisting and she
said oh I’d love to go to uni but I don’t think I’m smart enough she wanted
several awards while she was here and she’s got a one different job now she
was literally snapped up so I think if you’re coming with
right attitude everybody can come to University so I’ll leave you with
Hannah’s quote thank you Thank You Kathy so hopefully that gives you some insight
into the Bachelor of Dental Surgery and the Bachelor of oral health I’m just
going to very very quickly mention the admissions process because we have some
lovely students over there that I’d rather them talk you hear from them than
hear from me so please note that there is two separate guides for The Bachelor
of oral health if you’re considering applying for 2020 and international and
a domestic version as we have highlighted there are some prerequisites
subjects so in year 12 you needed to be studying either math or science so 120
credit subject from either the maths or science learning areas you’ll need a
minimum 8r of 70 or an IB score of 25 and to cover the academic component you
cat is also a part of the admissions process as well and say take application
online as you’ve heard with the dental surgery there is an interview process as
well and that happens at the same time as the dental surgery program so very
similar timelines but for those timelines and all the detail please
access the relevant guides so I’m now going to invite the panel up to talk to
you this is your opportunity to question them find out what they like find out
what they don’t like and find out about their experience in the program so I’ll
let them introduce themselves but if you want to come up now everyone I’m Calvin
I’m a fourth-year deads was cheating and starting this year I’m also concurrently
taking a part-time artists degree hi everyone I’m Harsha
I’m in my third year of Bachelor of Dental Surgery I’m Sinead on my final
year of the Bachelor of oral health hi I’m Lauren and I’m also my final year of
our health does anybody got any questions for the student panel maybe Calvin if you could start with
something that you’ve really enjoyed over the course of your program I think
something that the dental school does very well is they start you from the
basics like the bare bone basics so you learn about what a healthy mouth healthy
person should be and then I think it quite logically steps through what
disease looks like so it starts off very important and then it becomes more and
more specific as time goes on and the great thing is when you’re learning all
the theory you’re also starting in the clinics pretty much straightaway so
you’re not only learning from lectures but you’re also learning in the clinic
from your tutors from your colleagues from just anyone really I think that’s
probably one of the best things about this course you know have any questions
just raise your hand if you’ve got some questions otherwise we’ll just continue
down so letting him from what Calvin just said I think one of the great
things about a degree the BDS is that from first year your first week of uni
you guys start to see the clinic and you get to work on each other and I remember
I actually made it in as a sort of like a last minute place and in my on
orientation day I was told that that week on Friday we had clinic Adam Gillis
Plains and I was new I mean to stay at student I’m from Sydney I had no idea
about Adelaide would ago what anything like what everything’s all about and all
of a sudden my starting clinics and I also hadn’t done biology in year 12 so
everything was a big shock to me but you find out that if you’re really
interested in what you’re learning anything is really possible you just
have to apply yourself and it’s fantastic that you get to start working
in clinics so early because that’s where everything becomes a meaningful you can
have all the lectures and beef you know given all this information but until you
get to apply it into a real life setting with an actual patient you can’t really
grasp all the knowledge that’s been provided to you and that’s what I really
like about my course you get to do so much clinical experience from day one
and how you really get to learn so much um
yeah as I said it’s really good start basically in first year and like yes
with the skeleton knowledge and then straight away you’re in the clinic as
well so you get to apply all that knowledge that you’ve been learning um I
also did move from interstate so it was quite daunting I’m starting University
like you know making friends and stuff like that but I think with oral health
and dentistry as well here the chance to make some really good friendships within
our degree and also without colleagues in dentistry and you know as you move on
through all the years as well I guess yeah the the friendships keep growing
and you in a really supportive environment so that’s great yeah I think
we’ve all come from our own journey I started off as an older student I
remember what I finished at school there’s so much pressure to figure out
what you wouldn’t do what subjects in you to study and so I found for me I
decided to work instead I worked in retail for seven years and then I was
lucky enough to be able to get a traineeship doing dental assisting and I
was able to work full-time for two years during dental assisting and so I was
able to get that exposure and see what I loved and that’s why I decided to go
down the path of our health because there’s big focus on our health
promotion hygiene therapy getting the work with children it’s so so rewarding
and that was just what I was passionate about in those areas but also that was
that shuttled out like I’m an older student am i smart enough I haven’t
written an essay or done reports and so so long but I found that everyone is so
supportive it is a small group of people so you do get to learn like there to
know everyone really well we had a lot of support from the people in the year
above us and we still have a lot of got to do with them even now that they’ve
graduated and we just get the best support from all our tutors I did
biology near 12 and that was probably the extent of my math / science
knowledge but yeah you do start from the basics and I love it like a lot of my
friends had finished uni at that point when I started and they moved on health
but it’s great that now I can talk about them like I’ve got a really good broad
knowledge it’s not just knowing about the teeth you sort of get to learn
everything and I just love now that I’m in clinic mostly like being able to see
people through you know they come in they’ve got a problem but there is a
full story to that person and you get to know them and see them again and again
and see the improvements and it’s just so rewarding and if there’s something
you want to do the rest of your life you have to do something and when you go
home you just feel fulfilled and so that’s what I love about the course if
does anyone have any questions yes sure so the question was about and what
challenges have you faced in in the course so far it’s quite a broad
question you talking more about academic challenges or just anything in general so you’re gonna be told this time and
time again that it is quite a hefty course because one of the things when
you’re doing theory and clinical at the same time that also means you can’t
really there’s a lot of things to focus on at one time
so coming into University I know myself and a lot of my friends the first couple
years is sometimes hard to figure out the balance between social and academic
uhm I think it’s because of the support system the staff all very supportive I
would have to say that my experience in the course has been very good as well
with the people that I’ve been around it is a type cohort like dentistry is about
70 to 80 or holds about 30 you kind of know everyone and what I’ve noticed is
everyone is very supportive of each other so I know in high school can be
sometimes a very competitive environment but I feel like once we came in here
everyone just drops the dropsy act and just tries to help each other out so I
might not be answering your question very well sorry about that but I think
just like kind of developing your own way of going about things in not being
afraid to reach out to other people especially seniors as well has really
helped kind of overcome a lot of those academic challenges as something that
just comes as well because as you learn more and
more you learn about the way you think about things as well so it’s kind of an
ongoing process I’d say there’s challenges does anyone have anything to
add but is there any other questions
yes sure sure sure so the question was about
postgraduate studies in oral health a graduate certificate in oral health
science here at the at the school which is for our graduates who want to go on
and do a an extended scope of practice to treat adults in restorative care so
that’s a specific one but beyond that a lot of our other graduates can then go
into they’ve done postgraduate studies in counseling in Health Administration
in psychology so it’s quite broad because often they go into an area where
they’re there they’ve working in somewhere where they actually feel they
can go on we’ve got PhDs that have stayed in the
dental school and have gone through honours and masters and PhD pathways so
they have gotten a good access they don’t have these similar specialities
that dentists have so they don’t go into orthodontics so it’s probably more
broader but you can certainly go on to postgraduate courses in a whole number
of areas is there someone else yes show sure sure so good question that was
around the contact hours whilst you’re in the course but also extra extra
curricula as well so yeah I study bad for our health but I think the contact
hours are quite similar in that it’s probably like yeah pretty much like a
full-time job I’d say so my first and second year I worked after University at
a dental clinic you can do it but you have to be very very organized like I
mean I was at university in the morning at like 6:30 7 o’clock preparing for the
day or studying and then I would go straight from clinic sorry straight from
you need to the dental clinic that I worked at and I could do it but it was a
little bit stressful but I mean just to run your organization skills and perhaps
like some of us need to work it’s it’s a financial thing so yeah I think it’s
doable but it’s just about organization yeah sorry I can add that there’s also
like holiday time so like in the academic calendar it’s not just
full-time so there is mid semester breaks Mooji breaks and the breaks
between each academic year level so some of our students might you know work more
there it’s just a save up for the coming semester but there there are I think
what the students of trying to highlight is the balance and so if you can strike
a balance between it’s also the type of part-time work is it in hospitality or
sort of our customer service or is it in inner dental dental practice and
certainly both our students in Botha be right in the oral health program and
dentistry some of them work part-time as dental assistants so immerse themselves
further in the career yeah and that’s quite flexible where’s casuals we have some other questions I don’t yes okay so that was around the study tips
and preparation for UK so I might be able to answer that part
so really the individual preparation for the UK is that very individual we don’t
endorse any particular preparation courses it’s really up to you how you
prepare but at the end of the day it is an exam so tackle it like you would any
other exam that you currently do in school the UK website has a lot of
detail around the actual test itself and there is some online practice materials
as well that we would encourage you to access and sort of practice under the
time constraint so that’s really how we encourage you to prepare for the UK but
in terms of the study tips over to these guys was your question just 30 tips of
the you can mainly study tips in general yep so Johnny’s study what would you
suggest I think for me personally not much has changed with regards to how I
studied from high school through to uni so I’m I like to have a structure to my
day everyone works a little bit differently sir I’ve got a yearly plan
on my wall I’ve got a monthly planner and then I’ve got a daily checklist and
I know this kind of thing goes on Wi-Fi everyone but for me it’s almost a matter
of staying motivated so I like knowing that I’ve got a whole list of things I
need to get through today and taking them off and just having a look at the
end of the day and it’s just a matter of I think because our course is so full on
in the sandwich you have to do all the time there are days where you just can’t
achieve everything and that’s ok but you need to keep the the bigger picture in
mind all the time so that’s generally what I do and another interesting thing
to note I think in both about degrees is that the types of things that you need
to prepare for changes over the course so in first and second year there is a
lot more theoretical content so you’ll be studying more you know things you’re
lodging your lectures and choose in your after-hours time but later on as you
progress to seeing patients now what I do is much less theoretical study I
suppose because I have fewer classes but much more preparation for my patients so
what do they need what am I going to do Clinic session what sort of information
I need to provide them that sort of things so it’s very flexible it’s
different for everyone and it will change through your course but my big
advice do you publicly do what you know already works for you and you’ll always
be able to try and experiment new things and ask your friends what works with
them as well in uni I guess one thing I can recommend I guess would probably the
same for dentistry as well trying to attend every lecture even if you’re
super tired or anything like that if you go into the lecture and you take away
you know two or three things that’s two or three things you wouldn’t have if you
didn’t attend so I think that’s one big thing across the course is attendance
and yeah I guess any tips I could give would probably be everyone has different
learning styles on pretty much the same view I’m very systematic and I’ve got my
planner I’m taking frequent breaks and stuff like that because as we know it
our brain does need that just to consolidate information so your drink
swap that make sure you don’t you know it swamp yourself look after yourself
sleep well eat well or that sort of thing and yeah I guess it runs very
different so yeah I mean for me I’ve always been a learner that works better
if I do if I study with some other people because I find if I can explain
it to somebody else that understands as well then I know that I’ve got it right
and ultimately when you have patience as well you have to be able to explain it
to them too so sometimes trying to write learn and just like you know get it in
your head to put it down on the paper isn’t always the best way to go I’d just
like to yeah talk about it with someone else and yeah if I can do that then I
know that I understand it and that’s really important for me I never really
had like a plan of how to study so I just kind of have to wing it a little
bit after being away from school for so long but yeah that’s how I just enjoyed
doing it with someone else because they know what you’re going through as well
like I said there’s always that support system there for you in this degree and
it’s so important to keep that balance as well I think you can’t burn yourself
out because it is a lot of hours so just try to you know still do some things
that you enjoy or spend time with your friends that’s what I recommend
okay if we do have any other questions if you could hold them now I’m just
going to wrap up the session because we need to wrap up the online as well but
the student panel and staff will be outside to chat to you in more detail if
you do have any other burning questions but thank you for attending today and
thank you to our online viewers as well we hope to see all of you here as
students at the University of Adelaide in future years thank you for coming and
enjoy the rest of your weekend thank you you


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