Hospital User: Hospital Hub

Hospital User: Hospital Hub


Oregon EMS Data System
Hospital Training Oregon’s EMS Data System is available to hospital staff to retrieve patient care reports that have been submitted by EMS agencies transporting patients to your hospital. In this session, we’ll provide an overview of Oregon’s EMS data system. Then we’ll show you how to access the system and find and view patient care reports. We’ll also show you how to record hospital outcomes for those reports. Oregon’s EMS data system acts as a hub for patient care report data from Oregon’s EMS agencies. EMTs and paramedics are the cornerstone of this picture. They’re the ones who go on the EMS calls, care for patients, transport them to your hospital, and write a report of the care that they gave on the call. Agency administrators use the
information in the system to improve patient care in their agency. Hospital
personnel such as yourself also have access to Oregon’s EMS data system. You
can retrieve the patient care reports for patients delivered to your hospital.
As a result, you’ll have better knowledge of what happened out on the scene and
can better prepare to treat the patients delivered to your hospital. You can also use the information in the
system for quality assurance and performance improvement. Oregon sends some information from its EMS data system to a national EMS database. Some data in that database is publicly available, so you can also go to the
national EMS database to run reports that help you better understand how EMS
is working across the country and perhaps compare EMS in your area
to EMS elsewhere. In addition to EMS agencies and hospitals, several other
people have access to Oregon’s EMS data system, including county health
departments, the State EMS Office, and public health officials and researchers.
In addition to retrieving patient care reports, Oregon’s EMS data system also
gives you the ability to record some hospital outcomes on those reports. The
value of doing so is that it helps the local EMS agency to understand what
happened to the patient after they transfered the patient to your hospital. As a
result of knowing that information, the agency can improve the way it provides
EMS care. The American College of Surgeons and other verification bodies
often have requirements that hospitals share outcome information with their EMS
agencies. Additionally, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) allows a hospital to share outcome information with an EMS agency who
treated the same patient. If you have questions about the
regulatory environment and how it both allows and requires you to share
hospital outcome information with your EMS agencies, please contact the Oregon
Health Authority using the contact information that we’ll provide at the end of
this session. Oregon uses a national EMS data standard called NEMSIS: the National EMS Information System. The first widely
adopted version of NEMSIS was NEMSIS version 2, which was released in 2004. Oregon began collecting some EMS data electronically in 2007 but really
ramped up its efforts in 2011. In the same year (2011) NEMSIS version 3 was
released nationally. Oregon is currently in the process of transitioning from
NEMSIS 2 to NEMSIS 3. The state began collecting NEMSIS 3
data in July 2015 and planned to have all EMS agencies across the state
transitioned to the new version by the beginning of 2017. Currently, over 80% of
Oregon’s EMS agencies are submitting data to the Oregon EMS data system. When you log into the system, you’ll see patient care reports for patients delivered to your hospital a few minutes ago up to a few years ago. Regardless of
which version of the data standard was used by the local EMS agency, you’ll see
a list of all patients delivered to your hospital in one location. The contents of
those patient care reports may look slightly different depending on whether the agency used the NEMSIS 2 or NEMSIS 3 standard. So, what is the NEMSIS data standard? The
National EMS Information System is a national standard that defines 423 data elements that could be collected on an EMS patient
care report. A core of those data elements are labeled as national
elements. They’re collected across the country, in every state. Outside of that,
each state has determined additional data elements that are important to
collect from all EMS agencies across the state. Oregon has done that and has
selected a state data set of just over 200 patient care report elements. Local
EMS agencies may choose to record and submit some additional data elements on
their patient care reports above and beyond the national and state core. What
this means is that from a hospital perspective you’re guaranteed a certain
core set of information on every patient care report, regardless of which agency
it came from. Now, does every patient care report contain 207 data elements on it? No, it doesn’t. It depends on the call. For
example, there are several data elements relating to cardiac arrest amd cardiac
resuscitation, but those elements will only be recorded on patient care reports
if there was cardiac arrest on the call. Next, let’s discuss the process by which
patient care reports become available to you in Oregon’s EMS data system. The
process differs slightly depending on whether the EMS agency directly uses
Oregon’s EMS Data System or they use a different product and then the
submit their data to the state system. Let’s first look at the process for
agencies that directly use Oregon’s EMS data system. To begin, they get dispatched
on a call, and they begin to respond to the call. Sometime after they start
responding to the call, they begin writing their patient care report. They
provide care to the patient and they decide where they’ll transport, and at
some point they record the destination hospital on their patient care report. As
soon as they do so, their patient care report becomes available to your hospital — even though they haven’t finished the call yet and haven’t finished their patient care
report yet. You can begin to pull up that patient care report to see early information about the situation on that call. Eventually EMS delivers the patient to your
hospital, and the crew finishes their call. Shortly after finishing the call,
they finish up their patient care report and mark it completed. Afterwards, they
may follow an internal agency review process within their EMS agency to make
sure that their report was accurate and complete. They may make changes to the
report over the next hours or days or even weeks. Eventually the agency sends
that report off to billing. This is the process for agencies using other data systems and then transferring their data to the state. The process within their
data system looks similar to what we just covered, but their patient care
report is not submitted to the state system until after they have marked it
completed or closed within their local EMS agency data system. What this means
is for those agencies you may not see a patient care report until after they’ve
completed the call or maybe even a day or two later. As soon as they do submit
their patient care report to the state system, it immediately becomes available
to your hospital if your hospital was marked as the destination for the
transport of that patient. We encourage you to have an open
dialogue with the EMS agencies that transport to your hospital to work on
the timeliness and quality of their patient care reporting. Stay connected to
your EMS agencies, and if you need help finding contact information, please get
in touch with staff at the Oregon Health Authority. Well, it’s time to get hands-on
and log into Oregon’s EMS data system. There are two types of user roles: hospital administrators have a roll called Hospital Hub Local Admin. Using that
role they can set up access for other users. Everyone else has the Hospital Hub User
role, which allows them to access patient care reports and record hospital
outcomes on those reports. In order to get access to the system, your Hospital Hub local administrator
first needs to create your user account with a temporary password. They’ll give that to you, and you’ll log in for the first time, and then you’ll be prompted to create a
new password for yourself. If your Hospital Hub local administrator has
already created your user account, then you’ll be able to use that account today to log in and follow along with this session. Here’s the address for Oregon’s EMS data
system: hub.emsbridge.com/or . We encourage you to shrink this video into one corner of your screen, go ahead and bring up a web browser, and
visit this address: hub.emsbridge.com/or . We recommend that you bookmark this address in your web browser. This is the login screen for the Hospital Hub of Oregon’s EMS data system. If you’ve been given your User account, go ahead and log in at this time. If you don’t have a user account yet, you’re welcome to use the guest account so that
you can follow along in this training. The user name is “guest”, and the password is “guest00”. Every time you log in, you’ll see this data privacy statement, which reminds you that the information in Oregon’s EMS data system is confidential. Click I Agree, and you’ll be in the system. I’m now logged in, and I can see a list
of recent patient care reports for patients that have been delivered to my
hospital. I can use Search to change what I see on this list. For example, I could
limit the list to a particular date range or to a particular EMS agency. If I know a certain patient that i’m
looking for, I can put in their last name or their date of birth to search for
them. I can also click Incoming, and this will give me a list of
patient care reports for patients that have come to my hospital in the last
couple of days. In this particular sample hospital, we haven’t had any patients
come in the last couple days. Let’s go back to the search list. We’ll leave
everything clear and click search to get back to our original list. I can use the
Settings button to modify what I see on this list. For example, I can remove columns from the list, and I can add other columns. The top half of this list
affects my search results, and the bottom half affects the incoming patients page.
With the changes that I just made, I now see patient names on my list of patient
care reports. Let’s choose one of these reports and view
it. I can click on a report to highlight it and then click Print. This brings up a
printable version of the patient care report for this patient. At this point, I
could save this report as a PDF and attach that PDF to a hospital chart in
the hospital’s electronic medical record system, or I could print the report. In
this list, I only see patient care reports where my hospital was recorded as the
destination. Sometimes I need to see more. For example, a patient may have been
responded to at an initial scene, then transported to a first hospital, and then
transported to my hospital for a higher level of care. I only see the report for
the transfer to my hospital, but it may be important for me to also see the
report for the initial scene response to that patient. If I think there are
related calls, I can highlight the patient care report that I’m interested
in and then click Related. This will bring up a list of patient care reports
that are related to the report that i’m looking at, and then I can view those
reports. As we said earlier, it’s really important
for EMS agencies to understand what happened to their patients after
delivering them to your hospital. It helps them to improve the care that they
give. You have the opportunity to record hospital outcomes in Oregon’s EMSdata system. To do so, select a report, as I’ve done here, and click Outcome. This will
bring up a screen with some information to collect on the outcome of this
patient. I can record the patient’s emergency department disposition,
hospital disposition, a patient registry ID such as a trauma registry ID,
total ICU length of stay, ventilator days, and date/time of discharge, as well as
the outcome at hospital discharge. To submit that information, click Save, and you’ll be notified that the outcome
data has been sent successfully. That outcome data is now available to
the EMS agency so they can understand what happened to this patient after
transferring the patient your hospital. I can click Close to return to the list of
incidents. Thanks for watching this session, where we provided some background about Oregon’s EMS data System and then reviewed how to log in,
search for, view, and print patient care reports, as well as how to record outcome
information. If you have questions or need more
information, first get in touch with your Hospital
Hub local administrator within your hospital. Next, you can contact the Oregon Health Authority, and you can get help from ImageTrend — in particular,
you can use the ImageTrend University, which contains online help resources
that you can use. Finally, if you want more information about the National EMS Information System data standard that we use, you can visit the NEMSIS website.


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