Medicare Plan Finder Overview

Medicare Plan Finder Overview


Male Speaker: Hi. In this video I’m going to give you an end to end tour of the new Medicare Plan Finder. This new plan finder will completely replace the old, or “legacy” plan finder on October 1st. So, let me emphasize the new Medicare Plan Finder will be your only choice during the open enrollment period, which starts on October 15th. This is the homepage for the new Medicare Plan Finder. You get the best experience for the new Plan Finder if you login, and you can easily create an account. If you already have a mymedicare.gov account, the same username and password will log you into the plan finder, even though it’s a different system. If you login, the Plan Finder will pull information from your records to help you along the process. For example, it will show you what prescriptions you filled in the last year to help you build your drug list. But before we login, let me show you how you can learn about your Medicare options. Let’s scroll down so you can see the rest of the page here. You can see on the lower left this “New To Medicare” area. This will help you learn about your options, and you can enroll in a plan from here if you want. So, you just click continue, and it’s going to ask you a couple of questions. We call this the “anonymous” area, and you can access this without logging in. If you’re looking to see what options are available to you under Medicare, you leave this first circle checked, and then you have to enter your zip code because the system needs to know where you live in order to be able to show you what options are available to you. I happen to live in the Seattle area, so I’m going to put in a zip code for downtown Seattle. And one tip, is it pulls up the county and you just want to click on that. The reason it does this is some zip codes include more than one county, and the plan options might vary from county to county. So, I’m going to click on King County, Washington. I will scroll down and click on next. Here you’re presented with the two ways that you can take your Medicare benefits. Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan. What this portion of the Plan Finder does is explain a little bit about each of these options, and you can start with either option and go back and forth. In this case, let’s start with original Medicare. The first page tells you in this green box over here the basics about original Medicare. It tells you that your Medicare Part A premium is usually free, if you have some work history and paid taxes, and the Medicare Part B premium is $135.50 for most people. With original Medicare, it covers about 80 percent of most medical bills, and you pay the 20 percent remaining cost. There’s also an option to buy something called Medicare Supplement Insurance or a Medigap policy to help cover those out-of-pocket costs. You can also add drug coverage through a Medicare Part D plan. With original Medicare, you can use any doctor or hospital that accepts Medicare anywhere in the United States. There’s also an information box down at the bottom here saying that if you tried to enroll late in a Medigap policy or drug plan, it may cost you more. So, this is just general information to tell you how Medicare works. Looking at the left-hand side, you can see first that we only have original Medicare checked. We’re not looking at any of the other options just yet. To show you what Original Medicare includes, we’ve got green checks next to hospital coverage for Medicare Part A, medical coverage for Medicare Part B, and red x’s showing that you don’t have any drug coverage yet and you don’t have any help with your out-of-pocket costs, so you still have to pay that 20 percent, a green check showing that you can go to any doctor or hospital that takes Medicare. And original Medicare does not cover vision, or hearing, or dental services, so that’s got a red x as well. Your total monthly premium at this point is $135.50 for most people, those people that have worked so they have that free Part A premium or maybe their spouse has that work history. So, let’s say you want to learn a little bit more about some of these other options. Maybe you want to add a Medicare supplement policy, or I’m going to call it a Medigap policy. You just click that box at the top, and now the green box gives you information on Medigap policies, and it bases it on your zip code. You’ll see the pricing tells you here is a range from $44 to $212.57. That’s because there are many different Medigap policies available from many different companies and so the price varies, but this is the range in the Seattle area. Over on the left, you can see that what was a red x now has changed to a green check showing that now you’ve got help paying for out-of-pocket costs. And at the bottom it adds the Part B premium you still have to pay along with the Medigap premium range. It gives you a total for what it would cost you overall. So, now I want to consider adding a drug plan. You can click that, and the green box on the right tells you a little bit about Medicare drug plans. And, again, there’s a range in prices because there are many, many drug plans. I’m going to show you how to compare them. Tt tells you that drug plans add separate drug coverage to original Medicare. You can generally only switch once a year, during your open enrollment period, and the plans vary in cost both for the premiums and the drugs they cover, and depending on what pharmacies you use. And, again, there’s an information box down at the bottom telling you that if try to enroll later in a drug plan, you may pay a penalty. Medicare wants you to have a Medicare drug plan, so if you don’t enroll when you’re first eligible, and sign up at a later time, there’s a small penalty you pay for as long as you have Part D coverage after that. I just want to point out that the information about original Medicare and a Medigap policy is still there, but it’s shrunk down. If you want to revisit that to review, you can just click on it. It will open up again or you can shrink it again as well. On the left-hand side here, it shows that now you’ve got a green check next to drugs. So, you’ve got green checks showing you’re covered for hospital, medical, drugs, out-of-pockets costs. You can still use any doctor in the U.S. that accepts Medicare. And there’s a big, red x next to vision, hearing and dental because original Medicare never covers those particular features. And then it shows you the premium range for each of the options you have selected, and gives you a total for that. That’s pretty much how original Medicare works and how the website explains it. It’s just basic information. It doesn’t go in to great detail. Let’s say now you want to look at your other option, a Medicare Advantage Plan. You would click the circle next to Medicare Advantage and notice that all the other boxes become unchecked because you can either have Medicare Advantage or original Medicare. You can’t ever have both at the same time. So, now the green box tells you a little bit about Medicare Advantage and what’s available in your zip code. Plan premiums vary from zero dollars to $295. It covers hospital and medical benefits provided by Medicare-approved companies. So, that company will provide the same basic benefits as Original Medicare but they do in their own way under their own plan rules. The next bullet is important. You have to use doctors and hospitals that are in that plan’s network except for an emergency. If you have an emergency, you can go to any doctor or hospital that accepts Medicare. Most of these plans include drug coverage and many of those plans, not all, include extra benefits like limited vision, hearing, and dental. And also, Medicare Advantage Plans have a yearly limit on out-of-pocket costs, unlike original Medicare. Now, it also adds a little bit of information down at the bottom that if you don’t add a Medicare Advantage plan when you’re first eligible, you may have to wait for the next open enrollment period. This is one of these things that you join it either when you first join Medicare, or during open enrollment in the fall for the coming year, and you stay in for the entire year unless you move or something like that. Now, going to the left here, you can see that Medicare Advantage plans include hospital and medical coverage, drugs in most cases, help with out-of-pocket costs, but there’s a big check next to use of any doctor or hospital that takes Medicare. Just reminding you that in a Medicare Advantage plan, you have to use a doctor or a hospital that is part of the network for that plan. So, these are mostly HMOs, or PPOs, things like that if you’re familiar with those. Down at the bottom, it reminds you that you still have to pay your Medicare Part B premium of $135.50 and then the range of premiums for Medicare Advantage plans, zero to $295 in my particular zip code for total of $135.50 to $430.50. That tells you a little bit about Medicare Advantage. So, now if you click ready to continue, it takes you to the next plan page and it sort of assumes since you’re looking at Medicare Advantage plans, and you clicked continue, that you’ve decided what you want is a Medicare Advantage plan. But you can change. If you want to get original Medicare and your drug plan, you just click that and it explains what that is. Or if you want to get Medicare and a drug plan and Medigap, you click on that. It advises you, and we’ve got links as well, to where you can get more information on Medigap plans. You have to contact the insurance company or an insurance agent to enroll in Medigap. It’s not something you can enroll in through the Medicare website. Now it also assumes you’re still in King County, Washington. So, at this point, we’re going to want to login. But I should also point out, on this page it asks you whether you have a Medicare number. If you’re just about to turn 65 and gain Medicare eligibility, you may not have a Medicare number yet. You can click no. You can still shop through this, what we call the anonymous side of the Plan Finder. If you have a Medicare number, you click yes and it just informs the system, you don’t have to give your Medicare number. And then you put in what your birthdate is, and that will help tell the system whether if maybe you’re turning 65 and you have an enrollment period coming, and that helps you figure out your choices. I’m going to go back and login. Down at the bottom of the page, it says for the best experience, login or create an account. So, we’re going to do that. This is the login page from that homepage I showed you originally. If you click login, it would take you to this page. If you you don’t have an account yet and need to create one, you can just hit this create account button. Two steps, it’s really easy. I’m not going to take you through that because there’s a separate video that will tell you how that works. Or you can just go up, if you already have a My Medicare account, and you put in your username and password. I’m just going to type that. I’m using a fictional identity here. I’ve got my password, and it will login. In this case, we’ve created an identity for John Doe. And if you click on John’s name here, you can see that he currently has a PDP, is a prescription drug plan called WellCare Classic. It gives the drug I.D. number if you ever needed that. And it says that he currently does not have any extra help. For people with lower incomes there are a variety of programs that help them pay their out-of-pocket costs. One of them is called Extra Help. If he had a subsidy, or if he had Medicaid in addition to Medicare, or something like that, it would show in this box, and the system will price things accordingly. But John right now has a Medicare drug plan, and he wants to look at what his drug plan options are for the coming year. So, he’s going to click on drug plan. And, again, it’s going to ask the zip code. Now, for the identity that we’ve created for John, he lives in Alabama. And let’s say he’s moving to my city of Seattle, and that will give him an opportunity to enroll for the remainder of 2019. I’m just going to click on King County, Washington, and you can see John is just a young gentleman. He was born January 1st, 1910. And the system is saying, “Well, you’re outside of open enrollment. You can only change your plan if you have a special enrollment period.” If he were moving from Alabama to Seattle, he’d have that. He could click on this link to do that, but we’re not going to go through that right now. I’m just going to click next. The first time that you login and look at this, it’s going to ask you about your search preferences and whether or not you want to see your drug costs when you compare plans. Most people do, so I’m going to say yes. And it asks how you normally fill your prescriptions: retail pharmacy, mail order, or both. I’m going to click both. It gives us lots of options. And then we go to the next page, it really shows you some of the power of logging in. What you see is a list of all the prescriptions that John has filled through Medicare in the last 12 months. Just this first time you login, you’ll see this list of all the prescriptions that he has filled. You can click this button to select all drugs and then add them to your list, but I don’t want to do that. So, I’m just going to add, let’s say he still takes the omeprazole, and the prednisone, and we’ll leave it at that. Click next and now you’ve got a drug list. So, at this point, John can verify his dosages, he still takes 40 milligrams of omeprazole, for example, and 10 milligrams of prednisone. And he can either say, “I’m done, that’s all my drugs,” or add another drug. We’re going to add a couple more drugs, just to make this interesting. So, you click add another drug, and you can start typing it in, and it will give you suggestions. So, John has started taking insulin. Let’s say he takes Humulin, which is a variety of insulin. So, you type it out until you get it on the list, click on the name, and put add drug. And then you get to put in the dosage. Now, Humulin is injectable and you can either get it in a vial or in a pen injector. We’re going to say he gets the pen, and anything that’s injectable, there’s also a packaging option. Pills don’t come up that way but injectable things do. John can get one 3 milliliter pen or a pack of five. We’re going to say he does a pack of five, and he gets one of those packs every month, and then add that to his list. Now, we’re going to add another drug. He also has arthritis. He takes Celebrex. Start typing it, Celebrex comes up on the list, and we can add the drug, but now we get a pop-up. Celebrex is a brand name drug. There’s a lower cost alternative, a generic drug, called celecoxib. And it asks whether he’d rather add the generic or add the brand, instead. Well, I’m actually going to put both on the list so that we can see how that all works. I’m just going to say add the generic, and it prepopulates the most common dose, and you can change it to whatever you want. We’ll just leave it at that 100-milligram dose. One per day is 30 every month. We’ll add that to the list. Now, I said I would add the brand name, as well, so let’s do that. One question I’ve gotten many times is whether can you add the same drug more than once? Because some people take different dosages of the drug. They might take 100 milligrams of something in the morning and then 50 milligrams at night. So, yes, you can add the drug multiple times. We’re going to put in Celebrex again, and this time we’re going to add the brand instead. So, we’re going to have both on the drug list. We really don’t want both, but we’ll just select the 200-milligram dose, same as the other, and when we get to comparing prices, you’re going to see why I did that as an example. So, you can see now every time we add a drug, it tells you at the bottom you’ve added this, we now have five drugs on our list. And we’re going to say that completes our list. We can continue to add up to 40 drugs, but that’s all we want, so we’re going to click done. Now John gets to pick his pharmacies. So, John’s staying near me in Seattle, so he asks me what pharmacies to go to, and Bartell is a well-known local pharmacy. I’m recommending that he check out Bartell pharmacy. And let’s do Walgreens, as well. I don’t see it on the first page, so we’ll go to the next page. We’re just picking these because they’re chain pharmacies, so they probably accept lots of plans, and they’re near to where he is. He can walk to them. So, we’ve picked two pharmacies. You can see the names down at the bottom. And also since we said he’d like access to the mail order pharmacies, too, we’ll get a price for mail orders as well. We’re going to click done saying we’ve finished our pharmacy selections. And now we see what prescription drug plans are available. So, there are 26 prescription drug plans available in King County, Washington that John can choose from. The first plan that’s shown is his current plan. It’s something called WellCare Classic. He pays $32.10 a month, and the drug cost, well, it’s pretty high. $3,144 for the remainder of this year, for three months. And we’re going to see if maybe we can do a little bit better. It also shows that of the two pharmacies we looked at, it happens that both of those are in-network, so that’s a good thing. If the pharmacy is out-of-network, you would have to pay full price for his drugs. So, if we go down below, you can see the 26 drug plans that are available to him, and today, you can search by lowest monthly premiums, or by the lowest drug costs, or by the lowest drug deductible. We’re going to search by lowest drug cost. Let me just say at this point, that I’m recording this video on September 25th, and we’re adding new things to the plan finder every day. We’re adding a lot of things before open enrollment. One of those is a new search that is the total out-of-pocket cost, so that includes premiums, deductibles, and the actual cost of the drug. That’ll help quite a bit. So, if we look at this, his current drug plan would cost him $3,144 for the remainder of the year because insulin is pretty expensive, there are some other expensive drugs on that list. If we look at the lowest cost just for drugs, there’s a Cigna plan, estimating about half that, $1,525, still pretty high. The premium is $49.40. It’s got a $100 drug deductible. One of the things we can do is we can compare drug plans, so our compare bar down at the bottom will accept up to three plans at once. It automatically selects your current plan, or you can click an x to take that off, but we’ll just leave that for the moment. Let’s look at this Cigna plan, and we’ll just look at the next one sort of at random, the next lowest drug costs. We’ll add that to compare as well. Let me just say, sometimes people pop up and ask: are you advocating for one pharmacy or another, or one drug plan? Not the case. I just chose two pharmacies that are walking distance from our location here, and we’re going to look at the his existing plan, and the two with the lowest drug costs, just to compare. So, let’s click the compare button and see what we look at. So, we get a summary of each of these plans. And on little tiles at the top, you see the star rating for the plan, the premium, , yearly drug deductible, and it shows the same for each plan. And if you go down a little bit further, it repeats that premium and deductible information. And here it shows how many of the drugs are covered. And in each case, it seems four of the five drugs are covered. So, there’s a problem if not all of his drugs are covered. That’s why his costs are probably so high. He has to pay retail for a drug that isn’t covered by the formulary of that plan. You want to try and find a plan that covers most if not all of your drugs. Looking at his estimated yearly drug costs, we can see that both Bartell Drugs and Walgreens and the mail-order pharmacy are in-network for his current plan. These are his costs for the remainder of the year, $3144, for example, at Bartell. A couple of dollars more at Walgreens or a little less with mail order. If you look at the next plan, again, everything’s in-network but notice the cost is quite a bit lower, but similar between the pharmacies. And a third plan also everything’s in-network and costs are really pretty similar. Now, we’re going to want to try and lower his costs quite a bit if we possibly can. So, what I’m going to do, this Cigna plan looks like it might be the least expensive. It’s got a pretty low drug deductible, higher than this one, lower than that one. It’s got a pretty low premium, relatively speaking, and it’s got the lowest drug cost overall. So, we’re going to look at the plan details for that. We’ll get a lot more information there. So, you click on the plan details button — at the top it reminds us again the premium and deductible. And here’s the breakdown of John’s costs for his drugs at Bartell. When we scroll down, we’ll see the next pharmacy. You can see that Celebrex, that brand name drug, is the one that’s not covered. It’s really expensive. It’d cost him $456 a month no matter what. For generic, for celecoxib, which is the generic for Celebrex, it’s $20.50 retail, which is what he would pay until he satisfied his deductible. It happens to be the same after his deductible. In the coverage gap it drops to $7.15, and catastrophic coverage is $8.50 a month. And his insulin is sort of a bargain. It’s $11, instead of the retail of $502, until he reaches his coverage gap where it goes up and then it drops in the catastrophic coverage phase if he has spent an awful lot on drugs and reaches that, but his spending probably won’t be that high. And the omeprazole is generic. It’s pretty cheap, so is the prednisone. So, he would be paying about $504.94 a month to fill all these prescriptions. But of course, he’s getting two drugs that have the same active ingredient, the brand and the generic. So, we’re going to play with that a little bit. If we scroll down just a little bit, and we can see the monthly cost is just about $10 higher the first month when he’s paying is the deductible, and then it’s $504 a month. At Walgreens, results are fairly similar. Again, it looks like the Celebrex probably isn’t covered because it’s always the retail price. The generic is less expensive, but it’s a higher price than it was at that other pharmacy. And the other drugs, they’re even cheaper than they were at Bartell, the first pharmacy. So, that’s interesting, and we’ll return to that. But he will be paying about $513 a month for this. So, it’s very similar between those two pharmacies, not a big deal there. And the mail-order pharmacy, well, that’s quite a bit more expensive, especially for the Celebrex. It’s a really high price for that. So, probably you don’t want to use a mail-order pharmacy in this case. If you go down further, you can see information about how these drugs are covered. So, in this other drug information, it gets a little technical. But basically, it talks about how your drugs are covered, or whether or not they’re covered. So, here are all the drugs on your list. Here’s the tier, tier one is a preferred generic drug, like the cheapest generics. Tier three might be a non-preferred generic drug. Tier six is a specialty drug, like insulin. And you can see down here that Celebrex is not covered at all, and that’s why we’re seeing the cost is so high. If it’s not covered on the drug plan’s formulary, then you have to pay the full retail price. Nobody wants to do that. So, also, under prior authorization, some plans for more expensive drugs will require you to get authorization before you can fill that. None of these have a prior authorization requirement. There are quantity limits, limits to how much medication the plan will allow you to fill each month. Sometimes that’s a safety issue. And you contact the plan to see how much that is. And something called step therapy. If your doctor’s written you a prescription for a really expensive drug, or one that may have bad side effects and there are other drugs that might do well for you that are less expensive, or safer for you, sometimes the plan will require you to try these other drugs first or show a medical reason why they’re not appropriate for you. But any rate, we’re seeing that Celebrex is not covered, and that’s why John’s costs are so very high in all of these estimates. I’m going to scroll down a little further, and you see John’s drug list again. And at the lower right-hand corner, there’s an edit or remove drugs link. I’m going to click on that, and we’re back to the drug list that we originally created. So, I’m going to scroll up so you can see it a little better, and the top one on the list is that Celebrex, the one that isn’t covered. But we have the generic on the list, too. So, we’re going to say that John’s decided he’ll just take the generic. We’re going to remove Celebrex by clicking remove drug and now it says we only have four drugs on the list. There were five before. So, we’re going to say once again we’re done with our list, and we’re back to that same plan selection list that we had before, showing his current plan at the top, and all the other 26 plans that are available. Once again, I’m going to sort this by lowest drug cost. Go down so they can see that. And it looks like the same two drug plans are still the least expensive. That isn’t always the case when you change your drug list, so we got these two least expensive by drug cost, not necessarily by premium, plans on our compare list. Let’s just compare them again. So, you see all this information is the same as before, but the drug costs are now very, very different. So, the first one, John’s current plan, one of his drugs still isn’t covered, so his drug costs are very, very high, about $1,776 a month. But the other two plans cover all four of his drugs and so the prices have dropped dramatically. Now he’d pay about $156 a month for that Cigna plan to get his drugs at Bartell, $177 at Walgreens, or the mail order still isn’t looking too good. It’s about $280 a month. For the third plan, he’d actually pay the least at the mail order pharmacy,. Bartell’s is about $186 a month. Walgreens’ $210. If he really wants to use the mail-order pharmacy, it’s the least expensive option for him there. So, again, we’re going to look at the plan details for John. We’ll look at the plan details for Cigna because that had the lowest cost overall. And you’ll see that at Bartell Drugs, and again Bartell is sort of a well-known local chain in the Seattle area, it’s not nationwide. But you can see that he’s going to pay about $20 for his generic Celebrex, about $11 for his insulin, $11 for his omeprazole, and $6 for his prednisone, for a total of $48.45 once he’s satisfied his deductible. If you look at Walgreens, the other pharmacy in the neighborhood, the total cost is a little bit higher, at $57 a month. But notice the difference is the celecoxib, the generic for Celebrex. It’s is higher, at $38.70. The insulin’s a little cheaper at $6. The omeprazole is a little cheaper. The prednisone’s a little cheaper. So, if John wants to, he can join this plan and he can fill three prescriptions at Walgreens. And if he wants to save a couple of bucks, he can walk over to Bartell’s, let’s scroll up to that, and fill his celecoxib there because it’s $20 instead of $38.70. So, there’s nothing that says you’d have to get all your prescriptions at one pharmacy, but the difference in the total is only about $9 a month. John find it more convenient to chose one pharmacy or the other. It’s totally up to him. So, let’s say all things considered, he’s decided he wants to do this. Go all the way down to the contact information for the plan, if he wants it. I was actually looking for enroll button, which I know is on the previous page, but I think it’s also on here. Yes, it’s the top of the page. You can click enroll, and it will take you to the online enrollment center. Remember, we can go through there, or we don’t have to. We can also just click “go back,” which I’m going to do. Back on this plan compare page, you can also enroll from here whichever plan you want. And you can go even further back to the page with all the plans, you can — I think — yes, there’s an enroll button by each plan. You can enroll if that’s the one you want. So, that’s pretty much all there is to see if you’re shopping for prescription drug plans. There are a lot of other bells and whistles, but that’s what most people will do. Now, we also talked about being able to consider a Medicare Advantage plan. From anywhere at this point, you can toggle back and forth to see your other options. Up here at the top, you can see it says there may be Medicare Advantage plans with lower drug costs, you can get more information about Medicare Advantage plans, or you can just go over here and click to view the 35 available Medicare Advantage plans in John’s area. So, let’s do that. Now, it’s going to show the Medicare Advantage plans that are available. And, once again, now this toggle here would take him back to drug plans if he wants to go back to where he was before. So, it always shows John’s current plan, it’s just a drug plan, not Medicare Advantage, at the top. And it shows the Medicare Advantage plans available in his area. So, things look a little different here. What I’m going to do first, is sort. Again, by lowest drug cost. That way it’s showing you the same kind of thing. And there are a lot of plans to look at, 35 in fact, but this is the basic plan card. It’s similar to what he saw for the drug plans, but there are a lot more options available and that you should consider for Medicare Advantage. So, there’s more on this card. It tells you that it’s got a $26 premium, zero-dollar health plan deductible, zero-dollar drug deductible. And Medicare Advantage plans have a maximum out-of-pocket cost each year, so it’s $6,700, so long as you stay in their network, and that’s important. You pay $10 to see a primary care physician, $45 for a specialist, and your estimated drug cost is $156. This plan covers vision, does not cover dental, hearing, transportation benefits, it does have fitness benefits, et cetera. So, this is just basic information, and you can look at plan details to see more. But maybe you don’t really want to compare 35 different plans. You can also filter, and you can do this on the drug plans, too, but there are fewer options. So, let’s click on filter plans. Then you have a bunch of choices. You can select what star rating you want. Only something with a really high star rating, maybe four stars or up. And Medicare Advantage plans can cover vision or dental or hearing. Do you want any of that? Is it a deal killer for you if it doesn’t have dental coverage? If it is, click on dental and it’ll only show you plans that have dental coverage and now four stars or more. And maybe you want a fitness benefit, as well, usually a gym membership. So, you put that in, click apply filters, and here are the results. Now, there are 23 plans that have four stars or up, dental benefits, and a fitness benefit. If we added more things, we’d probably cut it down to a smaller number. We’re still sorting on lowest drug costs and let’s just add the first three plans at random to compare. I say the first three plans because you can compare three at a time. No, let’s get three different companies because two of these are from AARP so let’s try this one called Providence. Click compare and you see this looks very much like what we saw for the drug plans. You’ve got a little summary of the basic information about the plans. This one’s four stars, that one’s four stars, that one’s four-and-a-half stars. Here are the monthly premiums, and it shows you what the deductibles are, out-of-pocket max, see it varies just a little bit for every plan. And if you scroll down, it tells you the basic information. What the plans cover and with Medicare Advantage plans you want to look at things like this: doctor services, you know, what do you pay for a primary care visit? Here it’s zero dollars, here it’s $5, here it’s $15 if you’re in-network. But if you go out of network, you pay 40 percent of the cost. The other plans won’t pay anything if you go out-of-network. So, you just think about what’s good for you. What you would pay for diagnostic tests and procedures. In this case, 20 percent. That’s what you’d normally pay under original Medicare. What would you pay for emergency care? Go down a little further, what it would cost you if you go to the hospital. And it goes on and on and it tells you certain things, and I want to point out some of the extra benefits, like hearing aids. First one not covered, second one not covered, third plan if you need a hearing aid and you go to one of their network audiologists, you pay between $699 and $999 for a hearing aid. Hearing aids are expensive, so that is a decent benefit. Preventive dental has zero copay here for two of them, third plan doesn’t have dental, from the looks of it. Comprehensive dental, it also says zero copay. Beware of this when it just in this summary says zero-dollar copay, not everything’s going to be covered. Even though it says comprehensive dental, like root canals and implants in the benefits you want to look at the plan details to get more information about them. So, you scroll down, you get more information about lots of things, including your drug costs. Let’s look at this first plan and the plan details. You’re getting much more information here, basic costs, we’ve seen all this before. I want to show you the hearing and dental services. Hearing exam oops, skipped too far. A hearing exam is $20 but hearing aids aren’t covered. If you look at preventive dental, zero-dollar copay for an oral exam, zero dollars copay for cleaning, or for x-rays, but limits apply. And it says there maybe limits to what the plan provides. You would need to get information from the plan, they have a brochure, we have a link to that on the plan finder where you can call and get more information. Most plans say you can have two exams, two cleanings per year, but find out what the rules are for your particular plan, the one you’re considering. Same thing on comprehensive dental. It says zero-dollar copay for all these things but what are the limits? I mean, can you get unlimited implants for zero-dollar copay? Probably not. Implants are really expensive. Find out what the rules are if that’s something that’s important to your decision. Same thing on vision and things like that. So, each of these plans will have lots of information. You go down, you have additional benefits, outpatient group therapy, et cetera, et cetera, outpatient coverage and costs, here are your drug costs, much like the same analysis we did before. What everything costs. And if you are sold, if you carefully considered all of this information, and you’re ready to enroll, you may want to consider the star ratings. If you click through, if you expand this page, you’ll get detailed information on all of the things that are considered in Medicare star ratings. So, for staying healthy, they get a four-star overall rating. If you open that up, it tells you their rating for breast cancer screening, colorecta screening, et cetera, et cetera. And then when all is said and done, up at the top, there is an enroll button here, or on that plan comparison page, we’ll go back to that. You can enroll in the plan if that’s what you’ve chosen to do. And that’s the basic overview of how the Plan Finder works for both drug plans and Medicare Advantage plans. The advantages of the new Medicare Plan Finder are it’s much more intuitive, much easier to use. If you create an account and login, it really helps you by showing you what prescriptions you’ve filled through Medicare in the last year to start that drug list. One last tip on that. If you’re new to Medicare, you create an account, and you sign in, it’s not going to show any of your prescriptions because you didn’t fill them through Medicare. Come the next year, that information will be available to you. So, that’s the Medicare Plan Finder. I want to thank you very much for your attention. Have a good day.


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