Tour: Nursing Simulation Lab

Tour: Nursing Simulation Lab


SPEAKER 1: –is the internet. KELSEY MCDONALD: Hi, guys. My name is Kelsey McDonald,
and I’m a junior nursing major from Naperville, Illinois. I’m just here to tell you–
me and Mark are just here to tell you a little
bit about our experience here in the Bradley
Simulation lab. MARK REISMAN: And my
name is Mark Reisman. I’m a senior nursing major
here Bradley University. Can’t wait to show
you guys this tour. I will preemptively
tell you, first of all, if you
have any questions, feel free to write them on
the right side of your screen. Let us know. And we’re free to answer
questions throughout this tour. The other thing is we’re
having a little bit of trouble with our Wi-Fi this morning. So if we cut out, we’ll be
back as soon as possible. OK? KELSEY MCDONALD: Come on, guys. Let’s go check it out. MARK REISMAN: So this
first room that we go into has a set up kind of along the
wall like a doctor’s office. And everything that we
do in this whole area is set up differently for
different situations that will arise during the nursing years. But here in the
doctor’s office we learn assessment skills, basic
assessment like a whole head to toe assessment. So you go through
your neuro assessment. You do respiratory assessment,
cardiac, little bit of everything. You learn how to take
vital signs, so– KELSEY MCDONALD: Hey, Mark
Want to take my blood pressure? MARK REISMAN: We’ll
do a blood pressure. We’ll do all sorts of stuff,
like taking your pulse and respiratory
rate, all that stuff gets done here on each other. So you get this practice early
on in your nursing career so that you’re a
little bit better at it as you go on through the years. KELSEY MCDONALD:
And the funny thing is I remember when I first
was in here as a sophomore, learning how to
take blood pressure. And I could not
hear a heartbeat. I was like, oh my gosh. I can’t even get
blood pressure down. But now I’m starting
IVs, catheters, and all kinds of fun
things while I’m currently in my OB&P’s rotation. MARK REISMAN: You’re
at 120 over 90. KELSEY MCDONALD: That
sounds about right. So the cool thing is here we
to use all the same equipment that we would use
in the hospital, and really just get
comfortable with the equipment as we’re moving
into the hospital. So we’re not like fumbling
around with certain things. MARK REISMAN: You just kind of
get to build your confidence up here. You know, it’s nice to talk
about it and to read about it and see all these things
in books and videos. But you really don’t truly get
the experience until your hands on. And here in our lab, that’s
all we do is get hands on. KELSEY MCDONALD: So if you guys
want to follow us this way. Over here, we just have–
so each year, each semester, we’ll get a different
skills– lab skills bag with different
things, materials that we’re going to
need for this semester. So obviously, as you move
throughout the years, you’re going to get different
materials, different things that you’re going to need. The same– pretty much
the standard things you get every year
is, you know, IV start kits, IV
tubing, catheter kits, just to practice and
refresh on those skills at the beginning
of every semester. MARK REISMAN: And
like I said earlier, it’s different every year. So here at Bradley, we do
three years of clinical. So we’re getting in
here in the skills lab. We get into the hospital
starting our sophomore year. Sophomore year is when
you get the skills bag that has the IV and the
medication administration kits. So you really– I mean,
you’re playing with needles even your sophomore year. In here, in the skills,
we get to do it safely and we get to learn with a
hands on experience, which is an awesome thing for us. Which it’s actually
interesting, we’re giving you guys this tour
right now because there’s sophomore students learning how
to give medications right now. We’re going to peek in there. Right here is a bathroom
kind of set up just like the hospital bathrooms. Basically the point of
this– first of all, we’re using it for
storage right now. These are our arms
that we start IVs on. But it also gets used
to– because you’re going to be in a bathroom. At some point in
your nursing career, you’re going to have to
help patient, first of all, safely get on to a toilet. These are patients with neuro
or muscular or skeletal deficits that you have to help out and
get them up and move them over onto a toilet. And so here, when we
come into our lab, we get to truly experience that. Let’s go check it out. KELSEY MCDONALD: So
here, like Mark said, we have some of our
sophomore students. They’re currently working
on drawing up medication. So sophomore year,
especially the beginning, is focused on medication
administration. So as you can see, we
have our instructors here. And we also have another
group back there. And they’re just perfecting
their medication administration skills. So a lot of the basic
stuff we start off with, but this is the important
stuff that we really need to make sure our students
are learning how to do properly and really doing it right. MARK REISMAN: The other
thing we have in this room, first of all, we
have all the needles that they use for
medication administration where they teach them
how to draw up a med, how to start an IV. But if you look around the
outside of the room here, we have these lower
simulation mannequins. These mannequins get used– and
there’s different things set up for each one. As Kelsey’s going
to model, this one is for subcutaneous injections. But each one of these
mannequins that lines the outside of the room is
used for different things to teach us different skills. So this is the
subcutaneous injection. We have IM injections next door. This one that’s set
up for catheters. One that we can put NG
tubes into patients. All sorts of different skills. And each one of
these is adaptable, so that you can change
them to do different things throughout the
semester, if they needed to teach us different skills. KELSEY MCDONALD: So, going
off of what Mark said, we have both male and
female mannequins. And that’s especially important
for catheter insertions because obviously
males and females are a little bit different. So we do have males and females. And we also do
have a pregnant mom so that you can feel
the fundus, which is something that is
very important in your OB assessments. MARK REISMAN: The
other thing I wanted to mention while
we’re in this room, we actually have these three
wheelchairs set up over here. The significance of
those wheelchairs is not only in that we get to
teach proper body mechanics and how to lift and
remove and turn and help patients that are
using wheelchairs– a lot of these being
paraplegics or patients who are unable to use their
legs– but we also consult. We have a doctor of
physical therapy program here at Bradley University. And our physical therapy
students and instructors will actually come down and
spend a day with the nursing students and teach us
proper body mechanics so, first of all, we’re
not hurting ourselves but we’re also not hurting
our patients when we get them up and out of the wheelchair. Grab a pair of gloves here. KELSEY MCDONALD: While Mark’s
grabbing a pair of gloves, I just wanted to point out
something we have back here. We have– some of the
sophomore students are working on a safety project. So their job here is to
identify what things are unsafe. So, for example, the
position of the bed. The position of the
bed should always be at the lowest
position for the patient. Side rails– all the
side rails are down, just how the cords are tangled. So their job is to identify
all of those things that are unsafe for the patient. So one of the main
goals in our skills lab is to really focus on safety. This is a safe place to
learn, learning what’s right and what’s wrong. And really learning how
to determine and find those situations in the
hospital and your clinicals that look unsafe. So, as a nursing student,
as a nurse in the future, our job is to always
make sure that everyone is safe– our patients,
ourselves our colleagues. So safety is obviously something
that’s really important to us here. It looks like Mark’s
going actually start and IV for us so– MARK REISMAN: So I put
on a pair of gloves because this is one
thing that I like to do. A lot of people get
terrified of starting IVs. And here, first of
all, we don’t practice on each other as students. Excuse me. Instead we practice
on these arms. And what we do is they’ve
got all these arms. You saw them when we were
in the bathroom earlier. But what you get to do
is you get to come in and, first of all,
it’s set up, it has the exact same veins, first
of all, that I have on my arm. And these blood bags over
here run through the arm. So when you put a needle,
in still get flash and you get blood return
just like you would on a real patient. What that allows us to do is
get experience, first of all, working with a needle so that
you get comfortable with it. And it just really creates
a good learning experience because you know exactly
what you’re going to do. You know what it’s
supposed to feel like. It’s just like starting
an IV on a real patient. Big stick here. And there we go. See I’ve got– KELSEY MCDONALD: As you can see,
we still get that flashback. So we use food dye to
simulate that blood, so we do see– that’s
something you always look for when you’re
starting an IV with a patient is that blood return. So this, we do have, as
you can see, the red fluid. And you’re able to see
that you are successfully able to start an IV here. MARK REISMAN: So once I get
that IV in, and take my Tegaderm off, pop my tourniquet–
thank you, Kelsey. And we could see if
we have flush, just like a real patient. And flush is right in. All right. You guys have any questions? All righty. KELSEY MCDONALD: All right. So next we’re going to go
to one of my favorite things in our simulation lab here. We have simulation mannequins. So actually we have one of
our professors right here. AMY GRUGAN: Hi, everyone. KELSEY MCDONALD: And she
will sit in the control room. So the control room is
where our teachers sit and they can see everything
that we’re doing, but we’re not able to see
them, buttons they’re pressing, and things like that. So– MARK REISMAN: So,
yeah, truly this is my favorite part
of the simulation lab. Everything else you get
to practice basic skills. You practice on each other
with basic assessment. But here– and we’ll show
you the mannequin here in a minute– you get
to truly experience what it’s like to be
the nurse in a situation where you have an
actual patient. So just to peek in here. Amy will talk a little
bit about what’s going on. AMY GRUGAN: So, what we do
here in the control room is we run the mannequin. What we’ve got is some
video capabilities so that we can not only watch
what the students are doing, we can see through
the one way mirror, but we can also record what
the students are doing. And so they can visualize what
they’ve done in the simulation after it’s complete. And talk about things
that they did well, things that maybe they
would improve upon, or things that they
would do differently. And so with this computer
I can run the mannequin. We can change different
variables with the mannequin. We can change their blood
pressure, heart rate, so on and so forth. We can talk through
the mannequin and so they have a voice. And maybe what you can
see through the one way glass– I’m not sure if
it’s going to come through– is that we can be the mannequin. So there’s Mark. How are you guys doing today? MARK REISMAN: Pretty good. AMY GRUGAN: OK. Make sure you’re checking
out your patient. So your patient’s
complaining of being sick. MARK REISMAN: So you’ve got
a little bit of nausea, so– [INAUDIBLE] What’s going on? What are you here for today? AMY GRUGAN: Oh, I
just feel terrible. MARK REISMAN: Feeling sick? AMY GRUGAN: Yep. KELSEY MCDONALD:
What’s going on? Have you gotten
sick at all today? AMY GRUGAN: No, I
haven’t thrown up. KELSEY MCDONALD: OK. Is there anything that we
can do for you right now? MANNEQUIN: I’m really thirsty. KELSEY MCDONALD: OK. MARK REISMAN: Thirsty? I don’t think we’re
going to let you have anything to drink until
we see one of our doctors. OK? AMY GRUGAN: Oh, all right. MARK REISMAN: But
as you can see, we get to actually
talk to the patient. He talked back to us. It’s not just Professor
Grugan’s talking to us. We have an actual
monitor, which shows– this is essentially
exactly what you see when you’re in the hospital. It’s got heart rate, and
arterial blood pressure, catenography monitoring. Everything that
you see basically right in the hospital,
here on this patient. He’s breathing. I don’t know if you’re
seeing chest rise and fall. But he’s breathing. We can check a pulse
down here in his foot. We can check a pulse
up on the radial area. You know, it’s awesome. He can even sweat. He does all these
really cool things that we get to truly
experience what it’s like to take care of a patient. And it makes all the difference
when you actually get in. Say, first of all,
we have a simulation where you have a med
error or a med– excuse me, a med reaction, a problem
where this patient could die. First of all, we get
to act as the nurse. We’re the first ones on hand. We’re the ones where if
you’re in the hospital and you have something
where there’s a medication reaction or some kind
of an error like that, the doctors and the nurses in
the area are going to take over and you kind of stand
off to the side. And that’s just kind of how
clinical works, you know. The best part about being
here is, first of all, this is of course not
a live human being. But we get to have
that real experience. Professor Grugan
has put this patient into ventricular fibrillation. So we would attach pads and
start CPR and shock them. But, you know, thank
you Professor Grugan. She’s killing our patient
right before your eyes. And that’s one of
the cool things. Look, and he cardioverted
himself out of v-fib. Wonderful. One of the great things
that we have to do is you have patients that
can code here in our lab. KELSEY MCDONALD: And
it’s always great to be exposed to those situation
here where you’re comfortable. You’re not being graded. It is a learning experience. So like Professor Grugan
was saying earlier, we talk about all
the things that– afterwards– that we did well
and things that we can work on and improve on. So if we are faced with
these situations in clinical, we’re prepared and
we’re not nervous like sometimes we might get here
in our simulation experiences so it’s a great experience. MARK REISMAN: It’s
a great experience because it’s not like
we’re getting graded, where they’re going
to get like upset and you’re going
to fail a class. It’s here. They understand that you haven’t
experienced anything like this before. And they’re here to
help you and help you experience the situation
and help you learn. KELSEY MCDONALD:
So like our– this is our adult simulation here. We do have a ped simulation
lab, which is really neat. Because obviously,
as you guys may know, infants and children are a
lot different from adults. So it’s really
important to not only learn in class about our
peds– pediatric and infant population– but to really
perform and get that experience here in our simulation lab. So I believe we have a
simulation group going on here, so if you guys want to come
in and check out what we do in our simulation experiences. So as you can see, they’re
in their gowns, their masks, and they have gloves on. That is kind of simulating
the experience here where our patient is in isolation. So they’re acting just like they
would in a hospital setting. So they’re wearing their
appropriate protective wear. And we have the mom over here. And then our nurses
here, so documenting. Some nurses over here
helping the baby. And then we have our
professor back here who’s kind of monitoring and
watching what the students are doing well, and just
kind of taking notes on what’s going on here. MOM: Why are you
suctioning the baby? SPEAKER 2: Because
she has secretions, and they’re getting
stuck in her throat. MARK REISMAN: So this is acting
as mom here in the corner. So what she’ll do is ask
questions and kind of make the simulation
as real as possible. So she just asked why
you suctioning the baby. You know, of course, she’s
just trying to make everything, like I said, as
real as possible. That’s the whole point
of the simulation, is to get in and have that
hands on patient experience that you wouldn’t
experience otherwise. All right? KELSEY MCDONALD: So this
our ped simulation lab, like we just talked about. So, as we finish our tour here,
if you guys have any questions, feel free to type them in. Otherwise, it was
really great showing you our simulation labs. And I hope you guys got to see
a little bit of what we do here at Bradley as nursing students. MARK REISMAN: Yeah, I
hope you enjoyed the tour. If you have any
questions, let us know.


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