Yale School of Nursing Disaster Simulation

Yale School of Nursing Disaster Simulation


[Warning siren]>>SHANNON PRANGER: There are
inherent dangers in the building.>>NEWS ANCHOR: Widespread
destruction.>>SHANNON PRANGER: There’s
glass on the floor, there’s blood, there’s food
items.>>TORNADO WITNESS: Look at the size
of this thing!>>SHANNON PRANGER: Just be
careful. There are a lot of victims in
there. [Wailing] Some of them are under things.>>ACTOR: There’s a shelf on top
of me!>>SHANNON PRANGER: So once
I give you the big pre-brief in here, we’re going to take the groups
out separately because you’re going to have different
instructions depending on what team you’re on.>>GINGER SHERRICK: So today we
are doing a simulation of a disaster. And it was chosen
to simulate a tornado that has hit a grocery store.>>SHANNON PRANGER: So remember
you can walk, finally, when prompted,
but don’t get right up. Give them a little, “Hey!”
because somebody’s got to help you. And then you’re shaken and
you’re like, “Okay, I’m fine.”>>ANN KURTH: So we use actors,
because that way you can control the range of the scenario. Make sure that the student gets that skill set that leads
to the competency that when they are then in a real,
live clinical scenario, they’ll have that base to draw
from.>>SHANNON PRANGER: “Be smart.” The first team coming in that
doesn’t have any equipment, they feel helpless. Because there’s really not much that they can do, and I try
to impress upon them there is a lot that they can do. If there is a wound, it will be obvious to you. Even if it’s under the
clothing you’ll notice maybe swelling.>>GINGER SHERRICK: This way we
can provide students an opportunity to work through
the aspects of being first personnel on the scene.>>STUDENT: Can we get a
stretcher for her?>>GINGER SHERRICK: They can
work through aspects of triage…>>STUDENT:So, I’m going to have
you come with me.>>GINGER SHERRICK: first aid
care….>>STUDENT: Check the wound.>>GINGER SHERRICK: to work on communication… …of rendering aid>>STUDENT: Alright let’s move
that leg.>>ANN KURTH: Disaster nursing is somewhat of a new area in the United States. It’s something that we’re going to need to do more and more of,
and so we were glad that we were able to do this specific
disaster simulation.>>SHANNON PRANGER: It seems
like the storm has passed so you’re going to head on in. Let’s go!>>STUDENT: Hi everyone,
we are nurses, we’re here to help.>>SHANNON PRANGER: When they
come in, they have a pair of gloves, that’s all they have.>>STUDENT: If you can walk to
me, please come to the sound of my voice.>>SHANNON PRANGER: The biggest
thing they can do is start assessing and categorizing the
patients.>>STUDENT: Can you squeeze my
hand? She should be at yellow.>>OTHER STUDENT:Travis…
I’m sending her into you. She’s pregnant, she’s okay.
She’s in distress, so please take a look at her baby.>>SHANNON PRANGER: They
organize in groups and they just start walking around the scene
and finding the patients. There’s 13 victims. So you see
this team is setting up stations. How to designate the
severity of the patients. So they’re using colored duct
tape to make areas where they’re going to bring out the sickest
people.>>ANN KURTH: What is it like to
think about maybe you are just the first responder,
maybe you were just driving to the grocery store that day and got caught in the storm. Now you have to respond,
draw on your training, because there are people
injured, and who’ve died.>>ACTOR: My arm!>>JEFF SHAW: The simulations
help reinforce the skills that you need so that they become
second nature. If you have a patient who is unresponsive, you don’t have to think about it, it’s just…you go in and you
do it. [Instructing patient]>>SHANNON PRANGER: I want them
to feel the anxiety and that feeling of like helplessness which comes in a disaster because it doesn’t matter how prepared you are, you can’t really prepare for the emotional part.>>STUDENT: What’s your name
honey? Laynie? And your name?>>GINGER SHERRICK: They need to
keep the victims calm, as well, even though they may be having
a lot of anxiety during this process.>>STUDENT: Jasmine this is
Laynie, Laynie this is Jasmine. She’s going to stay with you for
a little bit. Okay, that helps? Just keep her talking, please.>>GINGER SHERRICK: We need
to ensure that they’re coming across to the victims that they’re competent, they’re confident.>>SHANNON PRANGER: Don’t
forget they haven’t been exposed to any of this. This is new to all of them. So they don’t know what they’re
walking into. That’s what simulation is. It’s practice. And end simulation! Very well done! [cheers and applause] That was amazing! Crazy amazing!>>GINGER SHERRICK: You want to
let them do it. Really immerse yourself. Let it be real. And then we’ll talk about what was missing. What didn’t you have? You know what were your fears?>>JEFF SHAW: It was a really
good experience, just because I think it emphasizes teamwork. Staying calm in emergency situations like this.>>SHANNON PRANGER: Let’s
decompress. How did you feel?>>STUDENT: When I felt
panicked, I would look for them like “Where’s partner?” [laughter] “My friend and partner.” Like I had a point person at least so I
didn’t feel alone, then we could like kind of check in on the same patients. We broke it down into little leaders, too.>>SHANNON PRANGER: Did you each
take an aisle? Did you separate the building?
Did you just say just start walking and find people?
How…how did that work?>>STUDENT: Two people are going
to take anyone that can walk and then assess them elsewhere. At least we did that.>>OTHER STUDENT: But then there are people who need help more. and so just having to leave that situation and then later on come back to her was like really tough.>>SHANNON PRANGER: The reason
we chose this profession, right, is to help the community. So it doesn’t matter what our specialty is. People are going to look to us in an emergency to be the helpers. And they need to be exposed to this. We don’t know when things are
going to happen.>>ANN KURTH: Dealing with those
life changing encounters, in a very concentrated scenario
like that, and still being able to draw from the wisdom,
the science, the compassion, and be able to perform what
those people need. That’s what we want them to take
away.


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